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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Superpowers and client states in the Middle East found in the catalog.

Superpowers and client states in the Middle East

the imbalance of influence

  • 82 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Routledge in London, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Middle East,
  • United States,
  • Soviet Union,
  • Israel,
  • Syria
    • Subjects:
    • Middle East -- Foreign relations -- United States.,
    • United States -- Foreign relations -- Middle East.,
    • Middle East -- Foreign relations -- Soviet Union.,
    • Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- Middle East.,
    • United States -- Foreign relations -- Israel.,
    • Israel -- Foreign relations -- United States.,
    • Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- Syria.,
    • Syria -- Foreign relations -- Soviet Union.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      Statementedited by Moshe Efrat and Jacob Bercovitch.
      ContributionsEfrat, Moshe, 1927-, Bercovitch, Jacob.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJX1581.M628 S87 1991
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 272 p. ;
      Number of Pages272
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1884718M
      ISBN 10041500490X
      LC Control Number90045662

        The age of imperialism and the imposition of the Middle East states system. Arab states) and pro-Soviet ones (radical Arab nationalist states). Given Cold War competition, even in unequal patron-client relations between a global superpower and a regional power, the ‘tail’ frequently ‘wagged the dog’, Cited by:   The contemporary Middle East is not conducive to the flowering of new nation states, even in the case of the Kurds, who have many of the vital ingredients in place. They have bitter experience from the events of the first Gulf war of how running out ahead can lead to catastrophe – and how quickly the west can avert its gaze at the critical.

        How Iran, the Mideast's new superpower, is expanding its footprint across the region – and what it means Iran has achieved milestones of leverage . United States foreign policy in the Middle East has its roots as early as the Barbary Wars in the first years of the U.S.'s existence, but became much more expansive after World War an policy during the Cold War tried to prevent Soviet Union influence by supporting anti-communist regimes and backing Israel against Soviet-sponsored Arab countries.

      General. Geographically, the Middle East can be thought of as Western Asia with the addition of Egypt (which is the non-Maghreb region of Northern Africa) and with the exclusion of the Middle East was the first to experience a Neolithic Revolution (c. the 10th millennium BC), as well as the first to enter the Bronze Age (c. – BC) and Iron Age (c. – BC).   Not only do the ‘big powers’ never get tired of “ prettifying client states to keep the oil flowing,” the most cynical accounts will say that there is indeed a concerted attempt at setting up regimes that will be favorable to Western strategic needs, yet again. One is reminded of the infamous Iran coup d’état which saw the re Reviews: 2.


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Superpowers and client states in the Middle East Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Routledge Library Editions: War and Security in the Middle East: Superpowers and Client States in the Middle East: The Imbalance of Influence (Volume 12) (): Moshe Efrat, Jacob Bercovitch: Books. Jacob Bercovitch This book, first published inexamines in detail superpower-client relations in the Middle East.

The Middle East, with its protracted and seemingly insoluble conflict and complex patterns of loyalty and hostility, is the ideal setting for the study of such relationships. Proceeding from the premise that preoccupation with the Cold War rivalry prevented both superpowers from adequately assessing the situation on the ground in the Middle East, Taylor analyzes the efforts made by the U.S.

and the Soviet Union to gain political ascendancy in the area since Cited by: superpowers and client states in the middle east: the imbalance of influence.

edited by moshe efrat and jacob bercovitch. london, routledge, pp. statecraft in the middle east: oil, historical memory and popular culture. edited by eric davis and nicolas gavrielides. miami, florida.

Superpowers and client states in the Middle East. London ; New York: Routledge, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Moshe Efrat; Jacob Bercovitch.

In many ways, "The Superpowers and the Middle East" complements Malcolm Kerr's "The Arab Cold War" (), stressing the external dimension where Kerr looks at the intra-Arab one. Gerges finds three main themes rising above the welter of his well-marshalled detail: First, superpowers had great difficulty controlling their Middle Eastern clients, leading to the odd sight of tails wagging by: Some dormant conflicts erupted violently, while others, violent during the Cold War, moved toward peaceful resolution.

The contrast between the Middle East peace process and the eruption of war in the Balkans in the s illustrates these trends. During the Cold War, the Middle East was one of the more volatile war zones in the : Benjamin Miller.

The Superpowers and the Cold War in the Middle East By Rashid Khalidi This chapter analyzes America's Middle Eastern policies through the lens of its cold war rivalry with the Soviet : Rashid Khalidi.

Great Powers as Client States in a Middle East Cold War. Volume XIX. Fall. Number 3. John Turner. Turner is a doctoral candidate at Surrey University, United Kingdom.

The Middle East cold war has entered a new phase in the wake of the Arab Spring that will have significant implications for the region and the world at large. It has been. Policy in the Middle East" in Michael Confino and Shimon Shamir, eds., The USSR and the Middle East (New York: John Wiley, ); Alvin Z.

Rubinstein, "The Soviet Union's Imperial Policy in the Middle East," Middle East Review 15 (Fall/Winter ). 6 The most important works in this genre include L. Carl Brown, International Politics and the. Gerges finds three main themes rising above the welter of his well-marshalled detail: First, superpowers had great difficulty controlling their Middle Eastern clients, leading to the odd sight of tails wagging dogs.

Second, as U.S.-Soviet tensions sharpened, Arab states. The Superpowers and the Middle East: Regional and International Politics, Westview Press, pp. This is an excellent first book by a young Lebanese scholar. He brings analytical sophistication and detailed knowledge of a wide variety of sources to bear on a crucial period when the Cold War was being fought out in the Middle East.

The two books reviewed here deal with the policies and strategies of the two superpowers in the Middle East after the Second World War. Where Rami Ginat deals with the first decade, Abraham Ben-Zvi, a political scientist, covers the period up until the publication of his book and offers some prognoses.

Click on the book chapter title to read by: 3. In many ways, "The Superpowers and the Middle East" complements Malcolm Kerr's "The Arab Cold War" (), stressing the external dimension where Kerr looks at the intra-Arab one. Gerges finds three main themes rising above the welter of his well-marshalled detail: 3/5.

In this article, the United States’ presence in the Middle East has been divided into three distinct periods: the first ends in ; the second begins afterand the third begins after 2. The United States’ Foreign Policy toward the Middle East before World War IFile Size: KB. The Iraqi war’s polarization of the region, Islamic extremism, and the Arab Spring each affected the character of the Middle East and the terms by which the great powers could engage with it.

The Soviet Union used its relationship with Europe to gain economic cooperation with the Arab world during the Cold War and its influence in the Middle East by inciting proxy conflicts between the Arab states and their Jewish neighbors.

The superpowers interacted with proxy combatants, which factored into the Soviet Union's omission from the Camp David Accords. Ancient states such as Persia and Parthia, Greek city-states, and Ancient Rome sometimes created client states by making the leaders of that state subservient, having to provide tribute and soldiers.

Classical Athens, for example, forced weaker states into the Delian League and in some cases imposed democratic government on them. Later, Philip II of Macedon similarly imposed the League of Corinth. If U like to know, Iran (Persia = land of decent people) is the first United States in the world.

It was the first country that banned slavery thousand years age. In and Iran hit the 13th biggest economy. If the superpower like USA and British and Europe and. Conflicts in the Middle East between and Words | 8 Pages.

the conflict in the middle east between was not purely fuelled by the interest and concerns of the superpowers but rather of a series of conflictual incidents, aswell as the main wars that took place from the years from such as the: War, The Six Day War of and the Yom Kippur war of This superb book describes the superpowers' involvement in the Iran-Iraq war.

The study shows how the superpowers, particularly the United States, fuelled the fire of war and in some cases encouraged Saddam Hussein in his belligerency and aggression. It also shows how the superpowers failed to condemn Iraq for invading Iran, and how in the first two years of the war both superpowers refused to.

View Enhanced PDF Access article on Wiley Online Library (HTML view) Download PDF for offline viewing. Logged in as READCUBE_USER. Log out of ReadCube. Citing Literature. Vol Issue 3. Fall Pages Related; Information; Close Figure Viewer. Browse All Cited by: 3.